Vote for my Oracle OpenWorld Presentation on Oracle Mix

So, I submitted a presentation, “The Rich Get Richer: Ultimate RIA with Oracle ADF Faces RC Client-Side Objects” to Oracle OpenWorld 2009, in San Francisco this October. The presentation is about performing tasks that usually require a partial round-trip, such as cascading dropdowns, conditionally visible content, etc., with no server round-trip at all. I talk a bit about this, on a very theoretical level, here (in the section, “Consider a Javascript-Only Solution,”) but I plan to go into considerably more detail, giving practical examples and advice, in the presentation.

The presentation did not make the cut of abstracts selected by Oracle. But if you want to see it at OOW, there’s still a chance! Just vote for the presentation on Oracle Mix (you’ll need to create an Oracle Mix account if you don’t already have one, but it’s free and a good way to meet people in the ADF community).

See you at ODTUG and/or OOW!

RTM, the ADF Edition

Over on the ADF Methodology group, in a thread called ADF Study, we recently talked about ways to get up to speed with ADF. If you’ve been following this blog at all, you’ve probably guessed (from my sheer number of links to them) that I’m a big fan of the various ADF Developer’s Guides. I want to point these guides up a bit, because they’re a massively underused resource, for beginning and even experienced ADF developers.

Continue reading RTM, the ADF Edition

An ADF “Methodology for the Masses”

I’m pleased to announce that I’m going to be an “expert” in an Oracle OpenWord Unconference workshop session to develop an ADF Methodology for the now-in-technical-preview release 11g based on an end-to-end ADF technology stack (ADF BC/ADF Model Layer/ADF Task Flows/ADF Faces RC). This session was the brainchild of Oracle Fusion Middleware ACE Director and blogger Chris Muir, and will feature quite a number of Oracle ACEs and other ADF experts. My particular focus (in the sense of what I’m preparing for the most–the vast majority of the session is going to be in open workshop format) is architecting for reusability.

People of all levels of ADF experience are welcome–from novices who want to learn others’ ideas for solving methodological problems to experts who want to contribute their own. So if you’re going to be at Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco this year, wander across the street and check it out–just let us know you’re coming. Oh, and if you want to watch/participate in our advance discussion, you’re more than welcome to join our Google group.

The Year of AJAX, Take Four: Part II

Last week, I talked about the ADF Faces Rich Client components included in ADF 11g, the rich capabilities they offer, and the fact that I still don’t think they use AJAX to its full potential. I mentioned some examples of how I’d like to see these components evolve in 12g.

Of course, with JDeveloper 11g still in technical previews, JDeveloper 12g is not on the horizon yet–I don’t know if it’s even in development–so from the perspective of a developer out in the field, any discussion of how these components might be enhanced for 12g is still pretty pie-in-the-sky. What can developers do in the mean time?

Continue reading The Year of AJAX, Take Four: Part II

The Year of AJAX, Take Four: Part I

Unless you’ve been living in Plato’s cave for the last four years, trying to learn about web technology from shadows cast by someone’s monitor, you’ve at least heard of AJAX. It’s the wave of the (very near) future for web applications, one of the fundamental enabling technologies for “Web 2.0.” And, of course, this is the Year of AJAX, just like 2007 was. And 2006, 2005, and 2004.

It’s not that AJAX never really came into being. The technology has certainly been there since at least 2004. And plenty of web sites out there are using it. But it hasn’t become nearly as ubiquitous on the web as people keep constantly predicting. I think part of the reason is that developing AJAX applications from the ground up is not exactly easy, and is very time consuming, and there haven’t been a whole bunch of extensive, declaratively usable AJAX toolkits that integrate well with standard enterprise application technologies like JavaServer Faces.

Is that about to change? Oracle is now in Technical Preview 4 of Oracle JDeveloper 11g, and a production release is hoped for by the end of the year. JDeveloper 11g includes ADF Faces 11g, which itself includes the ADF Faces Rich Client components. ADF Rich Client (ADF RC) components, according to Oracle, “[extend] the Apache Trinidad component framework to provide a rich set of AJAX-enabled JSF components that radically simplifies rich internet application development.”

Continue reading The Year of AJAX, Take Four: Part I