The Next JDeveloper Patch Set

So, if I’ve timed this right, the next JDeveloper Patch Set will have been announcedby the time  this blog post goes up, so I should be able to talk about it.

There’s a new minor release of JDeveloper that’s targeted for some time in the next few months. Here’s a partial preview of its features: Continue reading The Next JDeveloper Patch Set

Simple ADF Client-Side Component Use Cases: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report IV

Last week, I talked about the essentials for doing any client-side component manipulation, as described in Lucas Jellema‘s ODTUG Kaleidoscope 2009 talk, “That’s Rich! Putting a smile on ADF Faces.” This week, I’m going to talk about a couple of simple use cases for client-side programming that he demonstrated.

Before I do that, though, I should mention what I think is currently the most important resource for client-side programming: Frank NimphiusJavaScript Programming Nuggets page. That contains a lot of tips about ADF Faces RC client-side programming, and goes into a considerably higher level of sophistication than Lucas’ talk did (or this post will). But in case you find that a bit intimidating to start out with, here are three very simple use cases for client-side programming.

Continue reading Simple ADF Client-Side Component Use Cases: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report IV

How to Use ADF Client-Side Components: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report III

Two weeks ago, I compared a pair of talks I saw at ODTUG Kaleidoscope 2009, “That’s Rich! Putting a smile on ADF Faces,” by Lucas Jellema, and “Fusion Design Fundamentals,” by Duncan Mills. In particular, I contrasted the two opinions given of ADF Faces RC client-side (that is, Javascript) programming, and came down on Lucas’ side: Adding Javascript to ADF Faces RC applications, though it shouldn’t be overdone, can be very useful, and the usual risks attendant on Javascript programming are significantly mitigated if you develop exclusively to the ADF Faces RC Client-Side API (rather than attempting direct access to/manipulation of the DOM) and understand what validation in Javascript can and can’t do (provide convenience for the user and protection against honest user error and provide real enforcement of data integrity, respectively).

What I didn’t get a chance to do in that post was talk about the actual tips for client-side component manipulation that Lucas provided. I’m going to do this over the next couple of weeks. This week, I’m going to talk about the essentials for doing any client-side component manipulation. Next week, I’ll talk about some specific component manipulation use cases that Lucas went over in his talk.

Continue reading How to Use ADF Client-Side Components: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report III

3000 Developers!: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report II

Last week, I talked a bit about the two talks I saw at ODTUG Kaleidoscope 2009 on Monday, Lucas Jellema‘s “That’s Rich! Putting a smile on ADF Faces,” and Duncan Mills‘ “Fusion Design Fundamentals.” My focus was the debate about whether and when to use custom Javascript and ADF Faces RC client-side objects. But both talks had a lot of interesting information outside the debate. In this post, I’m going to talk about Duncan’s account of the ADF methodology used by the team  at Oracle responsible for Oracle Fusion Applications–a massive rewrite of Oracle’s business applications based on ADF with the Fusion stack (that is, ADF all the way from bottom to top: business components, model, task flows, Faces RC). This team is is especially notable for its size–3000 developers–which makes a proper methodology even more critical than usual. Next week, I’m going to go into more specific detail about the client-side programming tips Lucas demonstrated.

Continue reading 3000 Developers!: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report II

To Javascript or not to Javascript: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report I

This is an (obviously) late post in a series of posts about ODTUG Kaleidoscope 2009. Monday was the least busy day for me at Kaleidoscope–I only attended two presentations, “That’s Rich! Putting a smile on ADF Faces,” by Lucas Jellema, and “Fusion Design Fundamentals,” by Duncan Mills. But it was perhaps the most thought-provoking of my days there. In fact, I have a full three posts worth of stuff to say about just these two talks. Today, I’m going to talk about a dramatic contrast: the two talks, among other things, represented opposite ends of a debate I consider quite important: the advisability, or lack thereof, of using ADF Faces RC client-side components.

Continue reading To Javascript or not to Javascript: Kaleidoscope ’09 Report I