Vote for my Oracle OpenWorld Presentation on Oracle Mix

So, I submitted a presentation, “The Rich Get Richer: Ultimate RIA with Oracle ADF Faces RC Client-Side Objects” to Oracle OpenWorld 2009, in San Francisco this October. The presentation is about performing tasks that usually require a partial round-trip, such as cascading dropdowns, conditionally visible content, etc., with no server round-trip at all. I talk a bit about this, on a very theoretical level, here (in the section, “Consider a Javascript-Only Solution,”) but I plan to go into considerably more detail, giving practical examples and advice, in the presentation.

The presentation did not make the cut of abstracts selected by Oracle. But if you want to see it at OOW, there’s still a chance! Just vote for the presentation on Oracle Mix (you’ll need to create an Oracle Mix account if you don’t already have one, but it’s free and a good way to meet people in the ADF community).

See you at ODTUG and/or OOW!

Extreme Reusability, Part I

As promised, I’m posting of the presentation I’d been hoping to give at the OOW Unconference Methodology Symposium last week, expanded slightly for the more forgiving medium of a blog. As it turns out, it’s expanded substantially more than I thought, so I’m going to divide it into two parts. This week, I’ll talk about the basics of the methodology, its goals, and the two techniques it relies heavily upon. Next week, I’ll talk about the actual development process it specifies.

“Extreme Reusability” (the name is not mine, but rather Chris Muir’s; however, I decided I like it) is an idea for an ADF development methodology for mid-sized teams (generally around 4-20 developers) that I’ve been recently expanding on. Continue reading Extreme Reusability, Part I

Should’ve Used OpenOffice

We had some great discussions at the Oracle ADF Methodology Unconference yesterday. We talked about adoption decisions (particularly about the whole ADF vs. APEX thing), testing methodologies, integrating ADF applications with reporting tools, and coding standards (interesting tip from Oracle’s Duncan Mills and Lynn Munsinger about this one: don’t get over-exuberant with your package structuring up front. Apps did at one point, and while it worked fine on Linux, porting it over to Windows caused it to break: the names of some of the files (which include whole package trees in them) exceeded Windows’ acceptable length limit. I believe the upshots of all the discussions are in (or will soon be in) the process of wikification.

Continue reading Should’ve Used OpenOffice

My Public Event Schedule at OOW

If you’re going to Oracle OpenWorld (OOW) next week, I’d love to meet you. As of now, I’m going to be at 3 public (as in, I’ll be there in a capacity where I’ll be accessible, not just as an audience member) events: