Extreme Reusability, Part II

Last week, I introduced the ADF development methodology I’m proposing, “Extreme Reusability,” articulated its goals, and discussed the techniques of “Generalize, Push up, and Customize” and “Think Globally, Deploy Locally” that are critical to the methodology. I didn’t, however, describe the actual…well, methodology, meaning the development cycle prescribed by Extreme Reusability.

Notice I didn’t say the application development lifecycle. That’s because developing under Extreme Reusability, like developing under SOA, isn’t primarily about the creation of standalone applications. You should think of the development cycle for extreme reusability as part of an enterprise-wide effort.

Development under Extreme Reusability involves developing along three separate but interacting (and communicating–communication is absolutely vital under this system) tracks: framework development, service development, and application development. These tracks are assigned to different individuals on the team, in (at a guess–remember this is a proposed methodology) somewhere around a 20-60-20 division for a typical organization’s needs.

Continue reading Extreme Reusability, Part II

Extreme Reusability, Part I

As promised, I’m posting of the presentation I’d been hoping to give at the OOW Unconference Methodology Symposium last week, expanded slightly for the more forgiving medium of a blog. As it turns out, it’s expanded substantially more than I thought, so I’m going to divide it into two parts. This week, I’ll talk about the basics of the methodology, its goals, and the two techniques it relies heavily upon. Next week, I’ll talk about the actual development process it specifies.

“Extreme Reusability” (the name is not mine, but rather Chris Muir’s; however, I decided I like it) is an idea for an ADF development methodology for mid-sized teams (generally around 4-20 developers) that I’ve been recently expanding on. Continue reading Extreme Reusability, Part I

Should’ve Used OpenOffice

We had some great discussions at the Oracle ADF Methodology Unconference yesterday. We talked about adoption decisions (particularly about the whole ADF vs. APEX thing), testing methodologies, integrating ADF applications with reporting tools, and coding standards (interesting tip from Oracle’s Duncan Mills and Lynn Munsinger about this one: don’t get over-exuberant with your package structuring up front. Apps did at one point, and while it worked fine on Linux, porting it over to Windows caused it to break: the names of some of the files (which include whole package trees in them) exceeded Windows’ acceptable length limit. I believe the upshots of all the discussions are in (or will soon be in) the process of wikification.

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My Public Event Schedule at OOW

If you’re going to Oracle OpenWorld (OOW) next week, I’d love to meet you. As of now, I’m going to be at 3 public (as in, I’ll be there in a capacity where I’ll be accessible, not just as an audience member) events:

RTM, the ADF Edition

Over on the ADF Methodology group, in a thread called ADF Study, we recently talked about ways to get up to speed with ADF. If you’ve been following this blog at all, you’ve probably guessed (from my sheer number of links to them) that I’m a big fan of the various ADF Developer’s Guides. I want to point these guides up a bit, because they’re a massively underused resource, for beginning and even experienced ADF developers.

Continue reading RTM, the ADF Edition